This Gothic Revival church, erected in 1910 to replace an 1873 wood-frame chapel, is the earliest and most prominent surviving institutional building in the once-rural freedman's community of Oberlin. The church sustained heavy damage from Hurricane…

This fine carousel, produced by Gustav A. Dentzel's Pennsylvania Carousel Company, originally operated at Bloomsbury Park; it was moved to Pullen Park in 1915. The carousel animals are thought to be the work of Salvatore Cernigliaro, master carver of…

Dr. Henry Martin Tupper founded the church in 1866 as Second Baptist Church, providing religious services and classes for African Americans, including theological training for preachers, adult education, and eventually high school and grade school…

Charles E. Hartage designed this building in a symmetrical Classical Revival style. The two-story, E-plan, brick structure with a central entrance pavilion features a colossal wooden portico with Tuscan-columns. Hartage was also the architect for…

Designed by architect James M. Kennedy, this three-story classically inspired brick building is the oldest standing public school building in Raleigh and one of the few remaining examples of this academic style. Murphey School played a significant…

Mary Elizabeth Hospital, established in 1914 as Raleigh's first private hospital, erected this building in 1920 to house forty-nine beds in a modern facility. Designed by hospital founder Dr. Harold Glascock, the building met the established…

Designed by the Raleigh architects G. Murray Nelson and Thomas W. Cooper, this Neoclassical Revival building imparts a feeling of governmental strength with its Ionic colonnade on raised, striated basement. Both the south and east sides serve as…

This Gothic Revival brick church was built by a congregation founded in 1873. It is located in the Method community, a post-Civil War freedman’s village since enveloped by Raleigh's growth. The stylish exuberance of its brick detailing is unusual for…

This was the first public high school for African Americans in Raleigh and continued as the only such school until 1953. Many influential members of the Raleigh African American community were Washington High School graduates. The building is an…

Raleigh's municipal fire department, organized in 1912, erected this small neighborhood fire station, one of the city's first. Resembling the surrounding modest bungalows of the Glenwood neighborhood, the station features dark brick walls, a…

Berry O'Kelly School is in the Method community, a freedman’s village established by former slave Jesse Mason and his family. The Agriculture Building is the oldest of only two surviving buildings from the multi-building school complex founded by…

These Mediterranean Revival buildings, designed by the firm of Atwood and Weeks, are emblematic of the role of agriculture in the economy of North Carolina and the tradition of state fairs begun in 1853. A pair of towers flank the Baroque-arched…

William Henley Deitrick received the 1930 American Institute of Architects outstanding school prize for the design of the Northern Italian Romanesque school. The ninety-five-foot-high tower marks the central entrance to the school, faced with ashlar…

The Catholic Diocese of Raleigh built St. Monica's for African American students in 1930, when all city schools were still segregated. This small building with spare Gothic detailing housed eight elementary grades in four classrooms. The school…

Thirty-six hand-carved, hand-painted horses--all jumpers--carry revelers around and around on the Chavis Park Carousel, a gem in the WPA-era park built for African Americans in segregated Raleigh. Before Chavis Park, African Americans had only…

The Raleigh Little Theatre, organized in 1936 as an outgrowth of the Works Progress Administration's Federal Theatre Project, stands at the edge of the best-planned, best-integrated, and best-preserved of Raleigh's park spaces. William Henley…

Estey Hall was the first structure built for the higher education of African American women in the United States and is the oldest surviving building on the Shaw University campus. Designed by G. S. H. Appleget, the building has a cross-gabled roof…

The office of Alfred B. Mullet, supervising architect of the United States Treasury Department, designed what was to be the first federal project in North Carolina following the Civil War. The building, which contains federal offices in addition to…

In 1886, this two-story frame farmhouse stood on ten acres well beyond the city limits. The Agricultural Experiment Station conducted research on tobacco, cotton, rice, and pea crops as well as on fertilizer, soil properties, insect control, and…

The City of Raleigh erected this octagonal brick tower to house its water supply in 1887; the structure included an attached two-story office building. Prominent Raleigh architect William Henley Dietrick removed the defunct tank in 1938 and converted…